Slow painting

Monday, 4 May 2009

All mine


...because no-one else in the family will touch it. I can't understand this. As a child the spring rhubarb was a very welcome fresh taste after a winter of tinned fruit and increasingly wizened apples. No imported raspberries from Guatemala in the north east of Scotland back in the 60s and 70s. But my children won't eat it, and my husband shudders at the sight, reminded of boarding school puddings. How can they resist? Look at those gorgeous pink stems. Compare them with the green tree trunks on sale in Tesco just now for £2.00 for not a very big amount.

However, I do have a weak point when it comes to stewing rhubarb. I put it on the gas on a very low heat, and I go away and read some blogs. Then, as was the case 10 minutes ago, it begins to dawn on me that there's a pleasant, if rather burnt smell coming from the kitchen. Almost in the same moment I remember that I have rhubarb cooking on the stove. Result - a boiled-over pan, a lake of pink juice in the well of the gas burner, and a sticky mess to wipe up. But it was worth it for the blog-reading episode I managed to fit in before starting some ironing.

10 comments:

Lindy MacDuff said...

I can't understand it, either, why folks turn up their nose to rhubarb. I remember my paternal grandmother making the best rhubarb pies when I was a child. My husband won't touch the stuff. All the same, I thank you for the reminder that I should start looking at the farm market for it so I can make a pie or sauce all for myself...maybe freeze some, too. :-9

Rafael said...

:-)) Forgetting things over the fire is the story of my daily life!
Well, rhubarb cakes is one of the forbidden pleasures in Bas-Languedoc, I think is to dry and too calcareous to grow it here. Something like an exotic fruit.

Babzy said...

I love rhubarb as everybody in the family , i made a rhubarbpie this week end , divine ;)

Lancashire rose said...

I picked rhubarb today but it isn't as gorgeous as yours. Mine is like the green tree trunks at Tesco! However, growing rhubarb in Texas is no mean feat. Started from seed last August and growing over the winter it is now as big as any rhubarb I have ever seen in England, In fact the leaves could pass for gunnera! It is grown as an annual. It is quite sweet for all its being green and was quite delicious. Now if only I could grow gooseberries and blackcurrants. Pomegranates- now there's something that I can grow!

Frankie / Nick said...

LOL Oh, that is too funny! How many times I have had the same thing happen!! I volunteer instruct computer basics as the local Senior Centre and I keep telling them to make sure the dinner is made and the grass is cut before they sit down in front of a computer. Needless to say I do not heed what I preach, lol. Like yourself, we love rhubard in any way, shape or form. You may wish to add strawberries to the rubard as you turn your heat off, makes for a wonderful mix.

Sue said...

LOL I'm up way past my bed time, and I haven't picked any rhubarb yet! Yours is lovely. I hope you were able to eat some of yours.

Lindy MacDuff said...

I just came across this recipe for rhubarb sorbet and thought you might be interested. I have not tried making it, so can't give a comment in that regard. It does sound refreshing, though.

http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/rhubarb_sorbet/

Linda said...

Thanks for the recipe, Lindy. I'll definitely give this a try to extend my rhubarb repertoire!

mitt vattenhål said...

so much they miss when they dont eat rhubarb!
Last yearI made marmalade with tast eof ginger and that was great. Otherwise it's mostly pies and cakes. A favourite is one filled with rhubarbs and some meringue on top :-)

mitt vattenhål said...

and another thing with rhubarb - one can make great concrete leaves using their big leaves!