Slow painting

Friday, 10 December 2010

Same but different


We took a quick walk round the allotment site on Sunday. Things were disconcertingly the same, but different. The fox's tracks were everywhere, and although paths and borders were hidden, in some places it had stuck to the invisible paths. In others, it had set off across raised beds.


It's been quite a while since we've done a tour of our neighbours. We saw several extremely spick and span plots which have obviously had a change of ownership. I resolved to return once the snow has gone and see exactly what they've done by way of plot improvements - and be shamed into action myself, probably.

One of the impressive features was this picnic table and seats, with the prime view of Calton Hill. A permanent seating area is the height of allotment civilisation. Sometimes I aspire to it, and at other times I think I'd rather keep it natural.


And the sheds had an Alpine chalet look.


It's all melting now. A soft west wind, and the sound of dripping and running water everywhere. City pavements are still treacherous, with a film of water over sheet ice. I'm impatient to see what's happening at the plot, but there's going to have to be some bare pavement showing before I risk the walk there.

11 comments:

Orkneyflowers said...

Lovely looking in the snow - the thing I found most bizarre here (no foxes) but I could clearly see the track trhough the yard into where the chickens live in the garden - and a clear cat trail right upto their door - bit of a worry - but amazing to see the 'foot activity' of birds, cats (fox) we don't normally see. I never knew my garden had so many birds!

Hazel said...

Thanks for the allotment tour. I am fascinated with allotments because I have seen so many on TV shows and movies. In Australia we have always aspired to back yards and therefore backyard vegetable patches. However things are changing because our cities are growing and becoming more dense. Community gardens are starting to crop up (like the pun?) here and there. I suppose these are forms of allotment gardening. Stay warm!

Mark Willis said...

Hi Linda; I think it will be a fair while before you get to do any work on that plot! I'm due in Edinburgh for a couple of days next Sunday, so I'm hoping that Scotland will have thawed out a bit by then.

Jo said...

It's a few weeks since I've seen my allotment. I'm going to take a trip this weekend to check it over.

Green Lane Allotments said...

The snow and ice having disappeared completely here now leaving everything looking drab and wet.

Mo said...

Brrr looks so cold. I should stop complaining about how cold it is here.

Why I garden... said...

Thats alot of snow. Ours is all gone now!

Kris said...

Linda, Sounds like the worst is over for you (all but the melting). Keep a happy thought that all that melt will be a boon to the gardens!

Right now a blizzard is hammering midwest States and coming this way. It should arrive here tonight. Last night's pre-frontal rain has melted nearly all the snow so hopefully we'll get enough new snow to insulate the plants before temps plummet into teens the rest of the week.

Remember when we all complained about the bizarre hot/dry summer? Now we can puzzle about the weird (and early) winter. Keep snug and tread carefully. :-D

fer said...

Beautiful! I like the little sheds look

Jacqui said...

I imagine the tracks have been well covered up by now :) Keep warm. x

donna said...

Luv the Alpine chalets photo, very nice. So, you're snow will melt? Consider yourself lucky. Once we're covered in snow, the temps stay cold enough for the snow cover to last until March/April. I can only imagine how great it would be to be working in the garden and look up to see Carlton Hill.

donna