Slow painting

Monday, 27 July 2009

Back garden harvest

Years of attack by snails have reduced the range of fruit and veg I'm willing to risk in our small back garden. Lettuces disappear overnight, no matter what defences I put up.

Here's what's growing at home this summer. The blueberries above are 'Nui', and are doing well in their first year. Our soil isn't particularly acidic, but I've added sawdust and water when I remember with ericaceous feed. The variety below is 'Bluecrop', not doing so well in its second year. I think I need to increase the acid feeding regime. Somehow it can be more difficult to look after plants that are right outside the back door than those at the allotment.


I've seen a few bounteous shots of blueberries recently on North American blogs, and they've reminded me that blueberries are one of our great treats when we cross the Atlantic (which isn't as often as we'd like). Big bags of blueberries and cherries are what we make for on our first shopping expedition. Here we have measly 4 ounce punnets imported from Poland for 'only' £1.99.


The Alpine strawberries are enjoying this year's damp summer. I remember now that I ordered half a dozen of the 'Baron Solemacher' variety for the allotment some months back. I assume that they'll be delivered in the autumn.

The feathery stuff beside the strawberries are a mystery at the moment. It may be dill, or it may be love-in-a-mist. I daresay I'll find out soon.


Courgettes 'Black Forest' are doing surprisingly well for their shady situation, although some leaves are suffering snail attack.

10 comments:

donna said...

If I eat any more blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, cherries, I worry what might happen to me. It's a long winter here without all the fresh berries. Seeing your photos makes me hungry all over again. Interesting how the plants at the allotment seem easier to care for than the ones out your back door. I suppose at home, one says, "I'll do it later" and then later never happens. I've been having computer problems so haven't been here as much as I'd like.

June said...

Those blueberries would do any North American proud! Enjoy!!!

Sylvana said...

I forget that blueberries are US natives. They are my favorite berry - quite possibly my favorite fruit! I also love blackberries. And the two of them together... YUM!!

Juergen Kuehn said...

When I watch your photos I recognize your flora as ours - 2 weeks ago.

Gunilla said...

The Blueberrys are ready here in the forest it´s lots of them this year. I don´t pick them as much as I did when our kids were small but some I might have. Lingon I don´t know what they are called in english the red berries that are growing in our forest I hope you´ll know what I mean. We pick a lot of them , we have the jam to lot of dishes.

Thank´s for your visit.
Have a nice day

Gunilla

Frankie / Nick said...

Our cool spring and now extreme heat has caused the fruit, berries and vegetables to ripen at record speed. Everything is in abundance almost to the extreme.
I freeze a lot of berries and fruit. In the winter, I heat up a bit of water to the boiling point, drop in some frozen mixed fruit and shut the heat off. It thaws the fruit without ruining it's nutrition value by cooking. Use it as a fruit for desert, sometimes even with yogurt.

Dot O said...

I love blueberries! These photos are wonderful. Thanks, too, for stopping by my blog!

SandyCarlson said...

The sight of those blues makes my mouth water.

Anonymous said...

These photos are wonderful .I like this..............

Sue said...

I think your blueberries look good. I planted some strawberry plants given to me by a friend across the street a few days ago. I cleared out areas over there for some raspberries and asparagus today, too.

It was nice to hear from you on my blog.